Browse Items (22 total)

mpaaddb69ptrwf.pdf
On February 15, 1804, the Jesuits purchased Peter and his wife Prisc for St. Inigoes Plantation. They paid 400 dollars for the couple.

The ledger also indicates that on the same day they paid 3.77 to apprehend a "runaway Matt."

MPAPCRCC1814PS.pdf
In this meeting from 1814, the Corporation agreed to sell Jem and his family to settle the claims of William Pasquet, a secular clergyman who had managed the Deer Creek mission.

Since 1804, the priests of the Corporation had been selling enslaved…

Maryl.-1003-IV_0343 Mulledy to Roothaan 1830-01-07.pdf
In a letter to the new Jesuit Superior General Jan Roothaan, Rev. Thomas Mulledy SJ assesses the state of Georgetown College and poses a set of challenging questions regarding the Jesuits' slaveholding in Maryland. He asks whether the Jesuits' slave…

MPAB59F17.pdf
In this letter from 1816, Bishop Neale explains the rules governing Catholic marriages between enslaved persons. Priests had to get permission from the slaves' owners and the owners had to promise not to separate husbands and wives.

Fr. Lucas…

MPAB3F15AL.pdf
The back cover of an almanac owned by Fr. Arnold Livers lists twenty enslaved people who were probably part of the community at St. Inigoes. Three married couples are listed.

Fr. Livers was in charge of St. Inigoes from 1760 to 1767.

CHMCB6F8.pdf
Fr. John Grassi, President of Georgetown College, writes to Br. Marshall to inform him of the arrival of eleven enslaved persons to St. Inigoes. This remarkable letter also mentions the case of two men, Charles and Clem, whose marriages were being…

Maryl.-1004-II_0123 reduced.pdf
Letter written by Father Grivel to the Superior General of the Jesuits, Fr. Roothaan, concerning his assessment of the Maryland Province, and of the property and management of St. Thomas Manor in particular, and the problem of slavery. Fr. Grivel…

MPAB66F3.pdf
Rev. Thomas Mulledy expresses relief at having concluded the sale of the Jesuits' slaves. He reports that all the enslaved people had been put on board a ship except for those who were "married off" to husbands and wives who were not owned by the…

04:04:1793salemary.pdf
In 1793, the ledger of Bohemia plantation in Cecil County, Maryland registers the sale of an enslaved woman named Mary and her children for £40. A year prior to this transaction, the priests at Bohemia had purchased Mary and her family for £35.

MPAB49F3MHI.pdf
In 1792, the ledger of Bohemia plantation in Cecil County, Maryland registers the purchase of an enslaved woman named Mary and her children, Hannah and Isaac, from Samuel and John Fulton for £35.
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