Browse Items (73 total)

Southern Sentinel 1856-02-23 Barrow and Armstrong Succession Sale.pdf
A newspaper advertisement in the Southern Sentinel, February 23, 1856, publishing the terms of the sale of the estate of John S. Barrow and his wife, Margaret Amstrong. Barrow had purchased the plantation and slaves from the heirs of Jesse Batey, and…

ARSI Maryl-1007-I-9 Havermans letter first page.pdf
In this letter to the Superior General, Fr. Havermans laments the "grim and displeasing" sale of the Jesuits' slaves. In a postscript dated November 12, he reports the anguish expressed by enslaved people at Newtown as they were being gathered for…

ARSI Maryl.-1005-II_0171 Vespre notes.pdf
Rev. Francis Vespre, SJ records twenty distinct conditions placed on the sale of the people owned by the Jesuits. Conditions 1-8 have to do with the religious and family life of the people who are to be sold, and conditions 9-20 have to do with the…

Maryl.-1007-II_0197.jpg
In a letter to the Father General, Vespre explains the rental and management of the former plantation lands. He suggests ways for streamlining their oversight. He also expresses doubt that the Jesuits will ever receive the full proceeds from the…

AMST 272 Kenney Since Last We Met.mp3
Georgetown is buzzing with the excitement of reunion and reconciliation. The successors of slave-owning Jesuits and the ancestors of those they owned are coming back together in 2017 in the spirit of penance and forgiveness. In this podcast,…

Georgetown Film Studies students explore the parallels between a Jesuit’s unanswered plea and a University’s reconnection with the descendants of slaves it owned, sold, and spurned. With the call for accountability in Father Van de Velde, S.J.’s 1848…

Bill of sale for Wat 1802.pdf
Bill of sale for a man named Wat, sold by Charles Boarman to Rev. Leonard Neale, president of Georgetown College, for $400. Wat was then sold to St. Inigoes for $500. The 1838 "census" of enslaved people on the Jesuit plantations in Maryland lists a…

Neale 1808.pdf
This is a record of the 1808 sale of an unnamed enslaved woman as preserved in Georgetown's financial ledgers. Rev. Francis Neale, who would become president of the College the following year, purchased the woman from St. Inigoes for $240 "for the…

BussardSale.pdf
On July 6, 1810, Philip Bussard, a Presbyterian living in Georgetown, purchased "1 Negro Woman" from Georgetown College for $220. That same year Bussard served as defense council in a local freedom case, Mima Queen & Louisa Queen v. John Hepburn.…

John Llewellin.pdf
On March 14, 1801, a boarder named John Llewellin sold an enslaved person named George to Georgetown College for £67.10s. At the time, a year of board and expenses cost £50.
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2