Browse Items (147 total)

GAMMS24B1F1P135-137A.PDF
A map from St. Inigos plantation ca. 1820. This map indicates a "slave house" in the southwest corner of the plot, as well as other buildings such as a dwelling house, the place of the overseer, and the church.

GAMMS24b1f1p21-22.pdf
In a diary entry from 1820, Br. Joseph Mobberly offers an account of the whipping of Sucky, an enslaved woman who was punished as a child because she witnessed the self-flagellation of an unnamed priest from St. Inigo's Mission. For another…

MPAb64f3i10.pdf
In this letter from 1831, Father Joseph Carbery writes about the marriage Liddy, an enslaved woman from St. Inigoes, and the relocation of Lewis, a blacksmith "who never liked to live in the country."

GTM119b35f06i01.pdf
Upon Rev. John Ashton's death in 1815, his close friend Rev. Notley Young solicited a valuation of the people he owned. The valuation names and prices eleven people: Clem, Harrison, John, Michel, Ned, Bill, Isaac, Tagers, Barsil, Venus, and Nelly.…

GTM119b62f13i01.pdf
Father Francis Neale reports on the condition of Thomas Manor, where three slaves had died. Neale hired three more slaves to supply the plantation and build slave quarters.

MPAb70f4i4.pdf
In a letter from 1848, Fr. Steinbacher complains about the state of the Newtown mission and the behavior of its inhabitants, including the slaves and hired laborers of the mission.

Bronaugh 1.pdf
The family of Mitchell Bronaugh, a boarder, hired out two slaves to the College between 1838 and 1843. The College assigned Buck, a male slave, to the kitchen; he remained on Georgetown's payroll for months after Bronaugh left the school in 1841.…

Isaac Jail.pdf
An enslaved man named Isaac ran away from Georgetown College early in 1814. He was captured and jailed in Baltimore before being sold to a new owner in Hartford County, Maryland. The College paid $7.50 for his jail fees.

Mat.pdf
On New Year's Eve in 1835, the College purchased an enslaved boy named Mat from John Hoover for $500.

Rosters, 1805-1816.pdf
For several years in the early nineteenth century the College took an annual census of the campus population. In addition to priests, brothers, boarders, and scholastics, these rosters include the names of the College's servants and slaves.
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